How Effective are Public School Programs Generally Used to Teach Reading to Dyslexic Students?

How Effective are Public School Programs Generally Used to Teach Reading to Dyslexic Students?

For the most part, public school systems do a very poor job providing effective reading programs for dyslexic students.  Special education programs tend to stabilize the degree of reading failure rather than close the gap between children that learn to read in the typical manner and dyslexic students.  One study that looked at the effectiveness of special education services in a series of public schools, found that after children struggling to learn to read spent three years in a special education resource room as part of special education found no changes in word reading scores relative to their peers and the dyslexic students had a significant decline in their performance on measures of reading comprehension.  Another study which followed, supported these results; fourth and fifth graders receiving special education showed virtually no change in their rate of reading growth compared to their rate of growth when attending regular classes previously.  Therefore, it is no surprise, that the researchers observing the daily activities in resource rooms around the country confirmed that the reading programs the children were receiving lacked the essential elements found in effective interventions.  Researchers found minimal individualization of instruction as the children varied considerably in their reading ability.  To make matters worse, the researchers found that these children also are pulled out of the regular classroom often missing the language arts teaching that took place during the child’s absence.  This leads to children who need the most help with reading receiving the least help.

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